Interdisciplinary Studies Department

Resources / Course Descriptions

Use the links below to quickly find course descriptions.

African and African Diaspora Studies (AADS)

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44904499

American Studies (AMST)

11023700371037403750
37603770378044907000
71007200721072307240
73007310733074107420
74507460751075207700
7900

Asian Studies (ASIA)

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36703950442244574490

Gender and Womens Studies (GWST)

11022000205030013010
30203030306030703080
30903100339840004040
44004499

Interdisciplinary Studies (ISD)

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4490

Latin American/Latino Studies (LALS)

1102377037804490

Peace Studies (PAX)

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440044904499

Religious Studies (RELS)

1102378044004490

Science, Technology, and Society (STS)

210540004400

Descriptions of courses offered by the Interdisciplinary Studies Department are listed below. While every effort has been made to keep this list as current and up-to-date as possible, please consult your student handbook for the most current descriptions.


NOTE: Course credits given in the following format "0-0-0" translate to:
class hours - lab hours - total credits

African and African Diaspora Studies (AADS)

  • AADS 1101 - Introduction to African Diaspora Studies

    • This course provides a developmental introduction to the interdisciplinary origins and methods of African and African Diaspora Studies (also known as Black, Africana, African American, and Pan-African Studies). Students compare and contrast historical, cultural, economic, and social phenomena in Africa to African-descended people in the Americas, Europe, Oceania and Asia. Students learn about African and African Diaspora Studies as a field of intellectual inquiry and key contributions of pioneers from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds.
    • Prerequisites: None
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AADS 1102 - Issues in African and African Diaspora Studies

    • This course provides an overview of key concepts, problems, themes, strategies, and methods of African Diaspora Studies (also known as Black, Africana, African American, and Pan-African Studies). Students explore recent political, economic, and social problems facing the African Diaspora, especially issues of race, class, gender, religion, and ethnicity. Students learn how Africana Studies alumni have used their expertise in addressing these issues and how the discipline is relevant to their own career path.
    • Prerequisites: None
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AADS 2260 - Research Methodologies

    • This course is designed to expose the student to the variety of interdisciplinary research methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative, to prepare them for the methodological approaches appropriate for their chosen concentrations in African and African Diaspora Studies.
    • Prerequisites: MATH 1107 and AADS 2100
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AADS 3380 - Study Abroad

    • This course fulfills the study abroad requirement of the B.A. in African and African Diaspora Studies. The content of the course varies depending on available course offerings, but focuses on locations in Africa or locations significantly influenced by the African Diaspora.
    • Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status and permission of the instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AADS 3398 - Internship

    • This course is an out-of-the-classroom structured experience in a supervised setting that is related to the student's major and career interests. Practical experience is combined with scholarly research under the guidance of faculty and the internship supervisor. Internship sites must be secured in advance of the semester of the placement and must be approved by the instructor and internship coordinator.
    • Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status and permission of the instructor.
    • Credits: 3-6 Credit Hours
  • AADS 3500 - The Black Woman

    • This course introduces students to the experiences, theoretical contributions, and representations of Black women in the United States from feminist, literary, historical, and psychological perspectives. Students learn: (a) the impact of racial and gender oppression in the lived experiences of Black women historically and contemporarily; (b) the various ways Black women have coped with and resisted their oppression; and (c) the intersectional effects of class and sexual identity on Black women's lives.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AADS 3780 - Trends in African and African Diaspora Studies

    • This course focuses on current trends, issues, problems, and strategies in the field of African and African Diaspora Studies (also known as Black, Africana, African American, and Pan-African Studies). Particular attention is paid to how socio-demographic variables, such as race, gender, class, religion, and/or ethnicity impact the issues facing the African Diaspora.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AADS 4040 - Major Issues and Figures

    • This course offers an in-depth examination of a major issue or figure relevant to the field of African and African Diaspora Studies (also known as Black, Africana, African American, and Pan-African Studies).
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AADS 4100 - Directed Applied Research

    • This course offers students the opportunity to investigate AADS-oriented concepts and issues by participating in faculty-supervised research or scholarship. Course content and instructional methodologies are determined by the faculty member in discussion with the student.
    • Prerequisites: AADS 2260 and consent of the instructor and department chair.
    • Credits: 1-6 Credit Hours
  • AADS 4400 - Directed Study in African and African Diaspora Studies

    • This course is offered to students interested in investigating special topics and seminars external to regular course offerings. A maximum of 3 hours of AADS 4400 may be used toward satisfying the upper-division major requirements.
    • Prerequisites: AADS 2260, approval of the instructor and department chair.
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • AADS 4490 - Special Topics in African and African Diaspora Studies

    • A study of selected topics of interest to faculty and students relevant to the field of African and African-Diaspora Studies (also known as Black, Africana, African American, and Pan-African Studies).
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AADS 4499 - Senior Seminar

    • A capstone course in which students connect and integrate learning from AADS and other courses that they have taken in their concentration, explore the deeper issues in the discipline, research and write a senior thesis, and make technology-assisted presentation of their findings to a committee of AADS faculty.
    • Prerequisites: AADS 2260 plus 21 hours of upper level courses or permission of instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3

American Studies (AMST)

  • AMST 1102 - American Identities

    • This course explores what it means to be "American." Examining “American Identities” from local and global perspectives, and through a variety of disciplinary frameworks, this course focuses on the diverse forms of "American Identity," as well as the social and cultural histories that have shaped these identities. Students examine their own and others’ identities. Students gain knowledge and skills related to intercultural relations through various methods that include research, reading, writing, performance, and class activities.
    • Prerequisites: Successful completion of all Learning Support English and Learning Support Mathematics requirements.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 3700 - Principles and Methods of American Studies

    • Critically examines the meaning and culture of America locally and globally. This reading, writing, and discussion-based course introduces students to the interdisciplinary study of American cultures. The course uses a wide variety of readings and activities from multiple academic disciplines and popular culture.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 3710 - U.S. in the World

    • Examines 'America' as a cultural signifier that circulates around the world. These representations not only travel to other countries, but also return to us in cultural products from other countries. In addition to cultural theory, we will look at film, television, literature, and music as primary concern is to interrogate what ideological assumptions underlie our notion of what 'America' means.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 3740 - American Popular Culture

    • Critical analysis of popular culture in American society. A particular offering of the course could focus on a specific area of popular culture (e.g., books, music, sports, food, mass consumption or advertising) or survey several of those topics. Historical and theoretical readings will support students' analysis of primary texts, including examples highlighting the globalization of American popular culture, mass markets and niche markets, the social formation of taste, and shifts in society's preferences for mass consumption in different time periods.

       Notes: Course may be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 3750 - Place in American Culture

    • This course offers a thematic study of the cultural, social, and economic patterns of American places using texts and methods from a variety of disciplines such as history, literature, and sociology. Employing the techniques of critical reading and historical analysis, students interrogate texts ranging from contemporary prize-winning novels, film and media representations, to primary historical documents to gain a fuller understanding of both the place studied and the significance of 'place' in culture.

      Notes: Course may be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 3760 - Advanced Studies in American Identities

    • Examines the construction of individual identities and identity groups in American culture. Students survey and critique a range of texts expressing and representing the formation of identity constructions around such categories as race, gender, ethnicity, national origin, class, and sexuality. Students consider the various historical, cultural and social forces that shape (and sometimes resist) diverse views of American identity both within and outside the U.S.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 3770 - American Cultural Productions

    • Examines the production, interpretation, performance, circulation, and contestation of cultural practices and activities that produce ideas and beliefs about “America.” The course may focus on a particular cultural product (e.g., the suburbs) or cultural productions related to a particular historical period (e.g., the Great Depression) or other discrete category (e.g., racial productions). Notes: Course may be repeated with a change in content.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 3780 - American Cultural Movements

    • Examines the history of and relationships between selected cultural movements in the United States through an interdisciplinary lens. Drawing primarily on historical resources and cultural texts, the course analyzes the evolution and conduct of movements or of a particular major movement, as well as the evolution of academic inquiry and understanding of these movements. Notes: Course may be repeated with a change in content.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 4490 - Special Topics in American Studies

    • A study of selected special topics of interest to faculty and students. Notes: Course may be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7000 - American Studies Scholarship

    • This course explores a variety of themes, theoretical influences, and methodological approaches currently alive in American Studies and its related disciplinary fields. Particular emphasis is placed on the current controversies and scholarship focused on race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality. The course is organized around broad thematic concepts, with attention to global perspectives. The course introduces some basic conceptual building blocks in the field, as well as explores some of the historical development of American Studies.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in American Studies or permission of the program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7100 - American Studies Methods

    • The methods course introduces students to current methods in American Studies research and public practice. The course focuses on core concepts, objects of analysis, and evolving research practices used for working in American Studies. In this class, students will grapple with the concept of interdisciplinarity, examine the values of a variety of disciplinary methods and think consciously about which methods make the most sense for their own particular areas of interest in American Studies. Students will read works emphasizing methods of historical research, visual culture analysis, ethnography, literary criticism, as well as wholly interdisciplinary projects. While critiquing notable examples from the field, and working on their own research projects, students will also consider various professional contexts for “doing” American Studies, such as professional organizations and journals, classrooms, the workplace, public settings, and other diverse communities outside the university.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in American Studies or permission of the program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7200 - American Social Movements

    • This course examines the history of and relationship between selected social movements through an interdisciplinary lens. The course analyzes the evolution and conduct of movements, as well as the evolution of academic inquiry and understanding of these movements. The course emphasizes the connections between American social movements and those in other parts of the world. Topics discussed may include, but are not limited to, the abolitionist, labor, civil rights, American Indian, environmentalist, women’s, anti-war, reproductive rights, gay and lesbian, and anti-globalization movements among others. Course may be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in American Studies or permission of the program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7210 - Historical Period

    • Studies in a particular era in American culture by interpreting social events and practices, material culture, visual culture and print publications in a variety of forms. The course will invite students to examine individuals' impact on their historical moment as well as the influence important movements and social groups have exerted during specific periods, such as the Progressive Era, the 1960s, or the era of 'discovery' of the New World. Course may be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in American Studies or permission of the program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7230 - Public History and Culture

    • Public History and Culture examines the popular uses and presentations of the American past. Exploring historical memory's role in American culture, the course draws on a range of methods (e.g., site visits, research in popular publications, study of historical documentaries) to critique ways that the past is recorded and transmitted. Course content may include a rationale and debate about defining the parameters of the historical division, as well as an emphasis upon the significance of artifacts, lore, written and oral commentary of the period, and the language that both constructs and vivifies the meanings of past. Course may be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in American Studies or permission of the program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7240 - Enterprise & Labor in American Culture

    • This course will examine the history of enterprise and labor within their social and cultural contexts from an interdisciplinary perspective. The course will include an overview of the history of work and enterprise in the United States. Students will investigate business enterprise, work, production, and consumption as cultural phenomena. Topics may include: the emergence of the corporation; the labor movement and its cultural representations; enterprise and labor in film, television, literature, and popular culture; the work ethic as a cultural production; the history of corporate social responsibility; immigration and labor/enterprise; ethnic, racial, and gender diversity issues in American business and labor; exploration of labor and business concepts/issues through biography; the social/cultural impact of globalization; regional themes in labor and enterprise; American enterprise in the world. Course may be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in American Studies or permission of the program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7300 - Cities, Suburbs, and Countryside

    • Offers a thematic study of cultural, social, and economic patterns of the American metropolis using texts and methods from a variety of disciplines, such as history, literature, anthropology, and sociology. Students interrogate texts ranging from landmarks to literature, personal histories to government documents, advertising to architecture, to explore the shifting relationships between and ideas about American cities, suburbs, and countryside. Course may be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in American Studies or permission of the program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7310 - Regional Studies

    • Regional Studies offers a thematic study of cultural, social, and economic patterns of a representative region sing texts and methods from a variety of disciplines, such as history, literature, and sociology. Students interrogate texts ranging from literary prize-winning novels to primary historical documents located in the earliest settlement and in contemporary literature and historical analysis. Course may be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in American Studies or permission of the program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7330 - Identities and Social Groups

    • Examines the social construction of individual identities and social groups in American culture. Students survey and critique a range of texts expressing and representing the formation of identity constructions around such categories as race, gender, ethnicity, national origin, class, and sexuality. Students consider the various social forces that shape (and sometimes resist) various views of American identity both within and outside the U.S. and the Americas. Course may be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in American Studies or permission of the program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7410 - Literature and Performance in American Culture

    • Examines the history and cultural work of literary production and of performance as social practices that can be studied in regional, national, and international American contexts. This course draws its readings from both 'literary' and 'popular' culture publications. Students may explore both benchmark moments in American literary production (e.g., the publication of Uncle Tom's Cabin) and performance history. They may also examine important longer-term movements in the field of American literature and dramatic performance (e.g., the formation of 'American Literature' as a school discipline, developments in publishing, key moments in theater history); and/or approaches for linking history-making and cultural memory to performance texts. Course may be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in American Studies or permission of the program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7420 - Popular Culture in America

    • This course examines the role of popular and mass culture in the Americas by beginning with the premise that popular culture is an important site of expression, social instruction, and cultural conflict, and thus deserves critical attention. Students may examine theoretical texts as well as primary sources, and the course may include a focus on global consumerism in America as well as Americanized sites. The course may survey a range of popular texts, such as mass culture events (e.g., sports), advertising, popular music, and theme parks, and place these expressions of mass culture in political, economic, and social contexts. Alternatively, an offering may focus on a particular popular culture product (e.g., bestsellers; popular music) in depth. Course may be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in American Studies or permission of the program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7450 - American Visual Culture

    • Examines the history and cultural influences of visual culture in American life and the impact of U.S. visual culture in a global context. Emphasis is on the aesthetic, economic, and technological aspects of the film industry /or visual culture more broadly. Course content may deal with the history of film, television, photography, painting, sculpture, and or/architecture; the role of particular visual artists, film-makers or producers in shaping popular culture; tensions between high art, popular and commercial culture; or the role of visual culture in the American landscape. Students read from texts to gain historical perspective, see documentary films dealing with film /or the visual arts and landscape, view and analyze selected works, and consult reviews to ascertain their critical reception and impact on the community. The course may involve visits to off-campus sites. Course may be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in American Studies or permission of the program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7460 - Movements in American Culture

    • This course will explore artistic, literary, or other cultural movements in the broad context of American Culture. It may include courses in literary, film or art history, and discussions of broad cultural movements such as romanticism, realism, modernism and post-modernism as they appear in multiple cultural forms. Other examples of movements in American culture might include historically specific cultural movements such as the Black Arts Movement, historical surveys of cultural movements based in a particular ideology, community or social group, such as feminist cultural movements, or nationalism in American literature and the arts. This course may be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in American Studies or permission of the program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7510 - Passages to America

    • Students enrolled in Passages to America examine forced and voluntary migration and immigration in the historical development of American culture. The varied experiences of these individuals and their families are discussed in the context of such topics as racial and ethnic group relations, nativism, and social class formation. We examine power relations between dominant and subordinate groups, along with debates over citizenship, Americanization policies, and legal/illegal immigration. Finally, students analyze the cultural concepts of assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism that frame these debates. Course may be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in American Studies or permission of the program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7520 - America in Transnational Context

    • Examines interactions between Americans and other international groups. The course may address several time periods and locations or focus on a single case study (e.g., the impact of cross-cultural contact in a specific region or era). Besides secondary research from diverse disciplines, students use primary texts from popular culture to interpret the influence of American culture in other parts of the world (e.g., American television as viewed in other lands) and the ways that immigration of new groups has shaped the social landscape in the U.S. Course may be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in American Studies or permission of the program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7700 - Practicum (Internship or Applied Research Project)

    • This course requires students to apply American Studies knowledge, concepts, and theory to practical issues, non-academic environments, or to new research questions. The Practicum fosters the ability to (1) read and think critically while using diverse methods to study American cultural products and practices, (2) communicate effective analysis of American culture both orally and in writing, and (3) analyze and critique relationships between cultural products and social values. The practicum may be offered as an internship; applied research project; teaching practicum; or other applied experience as approved by the program director.
    • Prerequisites: AMST 7000 or AMST 7100
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • AMST 7900 - Capstone Experience

    • A major research project or a project using interdisciplinary methods from American Studies to investigate questions consistent with the program's mission and the student's professional goals. Students work with faculty advisors to develop a proposal, carry out research related to their topic or project aims, and complete a product drawing on the content of program courses and integrating it with new, individualized study.
    • Prerequisites: Permission of the program coordinator.
    • Credits: 3-0-3

Asian Studies (ASIA)

  • ASIA 1102 - Introduction to Asian Cultures

    • This General Education (GenEd) course provides an overview of key concepts, themes, strategies, and methods in Asian Studies. This course focuses on traditional and contemporary cultures of East Asia and South Asia, especially those of Greater China, Japan, Korea and India. The cultural investigation of Asia is infused with the historical, geographical, economical, political, and religious study of this region. This course also explores the identities of people in Asia and Asian Americans.
    • Prerequisites: None.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ASIA 3001 - Understanding Asia

    • This is the introductory course to KSU's Asian Studies Program. The course uses an interdisciplinary approach to understand Asia's ever-changing contexts. With emphasis on greater China, India, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia, the course provides the foundation for further studies of Asia including an overview of the region, connecting past influences to the present. Students examine the origins and development of Asian civilizations from the aspects of geography, people, society, history, philosophy, religion, politics, economy, literature and arts.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ASIA 3309 - Survey of Chinese Literature and Culture

    • ASIA 3309 Survey of Chinese Literature and Culture, cross-listed as FL 3309. A survey of Chinese literature and culture, examining major works and literary and artistic movements as well as cultural issues. Readings and discussion in English.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ASIA 3340 - Contemporary South Asian Literature

    • This course explores South Asian experiences by examining diverse aesthetic and cultural perspectives from 20th and 21st century diasporic South Asian literature. In order to familarize students with the diverse South Asian population, this course introduces students to a variety of South Asian experiences through literary works from diasporic writers in this demographic. Through critical reading and analysis, reflection, discussion, and research, students discover how similar the South Asian experience is to other familiar communities.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 2110.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ASIA 3355 - Cultures and Capitalisms in Asia

    • This course compares and contrasts various forms of capitalisms and cultures in Asia to understand the dynamics of society and political life. This course enables students to develop a global perspective on critical issues that concern policymakers, business-strategists, development-workers, and academics from an anthropological perspective. Students compare and contrast various forms of capitalism in Asia from an anthropological vantage point for understanding dynamics of society and political life in Asia.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 2201 and ENGL 1102.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ASIA 3670 - Survey of Asian Art

    • ASIA 3670 is a lecture/discussion course to survey the art of India and Southeast Asia, China, Japan, and Korea from prehistory to the present. Students in this course study the chronological developments of the major styles of painting, sculpture, architecture, and decorative arts from these regions. This course highlights important examples of works of art to discuss the artistic achievements and the aesthetics of these regions, and to explore how cultural, political, religious, and social climates have shaped the visual arts in Asia from the beginnings of its civilization to the 21st century. This course satisfies three credits toward an Asian Studies Minor--an interdisciplinary 15-credit program.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ASIA 3950 - Technology Strategy in Asia

    • This is a case study course that looks at organizational approaches to the integration of technology in multiple cultures. In this course, students will look at the international high-tech mindset, from business, social, financial markets, and personal life.
    • Prerequisites: One of the following: ASIA 3001, IS 2101, BISM 2100, or permission of the instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ASIA 4422 - Archaeology of Asia

    • This course examines cultural and historical developments in Asia from approximately 10,000 BCE through 1600 CE. Students learn about the rise of complex societies, cities, and states; early economies; empires; and the role of archaeology in modern Asia. Along the way, students engage in major debates that have arisen from competing interpretations of the archaeological record.
    • Prerequisites: ANTH 2201 or ASIA 3001 or permission of the instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ASIA 4457 - South Asian Politics: A Comparative Perspective

    • This course is an overview of the main issues that overlay politics in Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan. It covers the common historical background and the development of political institutions across the region. The course highlights the main cleavages along which politics are organized and related political, social, and economic outcomes, including the political party system, economic development, social movements, and ethnic conflict.
    • Prerequisites: ASIA 3001.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ASIA 4490 - Special Topics in Asian Studies

    • Selected special topics of interest to faculty and students working in Asian Studies.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3

Gender and Womens Studies (GWST)

  • GWST 1102 - Love and Sex

    • This course examines the phenomena of love and sex from multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives in a global context. Students will critically evaluate the personal and social significances of intimacy and analyze the ethical, political, and cultural dimensions of love and sex through a variety of media. Topics may include family; marriage and monogamy; sexual identity and orientation; reproductive politics; sex work; consent; and representation.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1101.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GWST 2000 - Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies

    • A survey of the foundational figures, themes, and texts in the history of gender and women’s studies in an interdisciplinary and global context. Themes to be addressed include sameness vs. difference feminisms; the sex/gender distinction; internal and external critiques of Western feminisms; transnational and global feminisms; feminism’s relationship to critical race studies, postcolonialism, queer theory; and gender, trans-gender, and masculinity studies. All sections include a required civic and community engagement project.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GWST 2050 - Global Perspectives on Gender

    • This course offers global perspectives and contexts within which gender can be explored, analyzed, and critiqued. The course will be driven by cross-cultural and comparative study and may include analysis of the construction of gender in relation to social practices, the law, tradition, religion, institutional culture, economics, and popular culture.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GWST 3001 - Feminist Theories

    • Feminist Theories involves the study of concepts and ideologies that articulate and define theories of feminism through the intersections of gender with race, class, nationality, sexuality, and other social differences. Students will engage with several foundational and vibrantly contested conversations within feminist theory that draw from a variety of theoretical perspectives, including those influenced by liberalism, Marxism/socialism, psychoanalysis, radical feminism, post-modernism, and post-colonialism.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GWST 3010 - Queer Theory & Sexuality

    • Queer Theory & Sexuality is an interdisciplinary course that considers the global emergence and significance of theories and practices that 1) refute and destabilize the notion of an essential, normative sexuality and gender and 2) suggest that sexuality is fluid and varied and is constructed by social, political, and economic factors. The course surveys a broad array of scholarship and other forms of print and non-print media and explores a range of topics that might broadly be identified as 1) practices, identities, and communities; 2) the cultural construction of gender and sexuality; 3) sexual citizenship and the nation-state
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GWST 3020 - Black Feminisms

    • A survey of historical and contemporary black feminist traditions. Core themes could include the intersections of race and gender with class, sexuality, generation, and place; black feminist thought and its relationship to womanism and other feminisms; outsider-within positionality of black women; black feminist epistemologies; mediated representations of black women’s identities; black lesbian feminism; commodification of black women’s bodies; black women’s global resistance to racism and sexism.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GWST 3030 - Gender in Popular Culture

    • An examination of gender as depicted in popular culture texts. Focusing on one medium (e.g., film, television, periodicals, music) or surveying a range of popular culture forms, students will critique depictions of gender; practice using theories and methods from gender and women’s studies to understand popular culture’s role in shaping gender identity; and do research on gender in the context of popular culture.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GWST 3060 - Gender in the Workplace

    • Gender and the Workplace examines work and professional-related gender issues from several perspectives, including the legal, sociological and economic viewpoints. Students will engage with a variety of relevant and timely topics that include gender stereotyping and discrimination, career development, diversity issues, sexual harassment, and work/life balance. As part of the course requirements, students will complete a civic/community engagement assignment relative to the course.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GWST 3070 - Gender and Social Justice

    • This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to the social and historical constitution of gender in a social justice framework. Students will explore a wide variety of critical and literary materials to analyze interlocking systems of hierarchy and domination; to evaluate gendered experience across local, regional, national, and global contexts; and to identify critical responses to systemic forms of oppression in the contemporary world.
    • Prerequisites: GWST 2000.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GWST 3080 - Masculinity Studies

    • Masculinities Studies is an interdsciplinary introduction to this growing and often contested field. Using a variety of texts, students explore historical, political, and theoretical development, as well as social and cultural constructions, of the category “masculinity.” Students map central debates surrounding masculinity, including why it is frequently thought to be “in crisis.” The course examines political and social movements related to masculinity as it considers masculinity in relation to other theories, including feminist, post-colonial, etc.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GWST 3090 - Transnational Feminisms

    • Transnational Feminisms is an inter-disciplinary study of the economic, social, and political consequences of the phenomenon known as globalization, particularly those consequences that affect issues of gender. As such, students analyze transnational feminisms, studying both the opportunities and challenges that are inherent in transnational feminist scholarship and activism. Through critical inquiry into a variety of texts, the course dynamically reconceptualizes relationships between women and nation; between gender and globalization; and between feminist theory and practice.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GWST 3100 - Gender and the U.S. South

    • Gender and the U.S. South examines intersections between cultural norms and values of the southern United States with gender and related identity categories such as race, class, and sexuality. The course invites students to consider ways that gender, race, class, and sexuality are complicated by and related to regional ideas, history, and identity. Additionally, the course explores gender in the U.S. South in connection with other cultures in the Global South.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GWST 3398 - Internship

    • A structured off-campus experience in a supervised setting that is chosen in relation to student’s focus and interests. Practical experience is combined with a research approach that investigates issues relevant to the internship. Students will meet with the internship coordinator to develop an appropriate plan that will lead to the writing of a research-oriented paper or research project, a required part of the internship. Students should consult with the internship coordinator at the midpoint of the semester prior to the internship to choose from an approved list of internship sites, none of which may be with a current employer.
    • Prerequisites: GWST 2000 and approval by internship coordinator.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GWST 4000 - Research in Gender and Women's Studies

    • A study of research models of scholarship in gender and women’s studies, combined with an opportunity for students to conduct a research project of their own. Students will read examples of outstanding research and survey discipline-based scholarship focusing on gender and women’s studies. Topics for studying methods could include debates regarding different methodologies, critiques of traditional research methodologies, integrating feminist theory with scholarship, and ethical questions associated with producing research in gender and women’s studies.
    • Prerequisites: GWST 2000 and completion of 60 credit hours.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GWST 4040 - Major Topics & Figures

    • This course offers an in-depth examination of a major topic or major figure relevant to the field of gender and women’s studies. Students will learn how to conduct interdisciplinary research and employ gender analysis through the advanced study of one major thinker or the advanced, comparative study of a set of thinkers grouped according to a major topic.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GWST 4400 - Directed Study

    • The Directed Study is an advanced, individual study of a selected topic not offered in the regular curriculum. Students may conduct in-depth, gender-related research under the supervision of a faculty member. The directed study is student driven, and students are responsible for selecting the subject matter to be studied, method, data sources, and theoretical question(s), all under the direction of a faculty member.
    • Prerequisites: Another GWST course, approval of instructor, and approval of program coordinator.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • GWST 4499 - Senior Seminar in GWST

    • This capstone course is designed to complete the major by integrating prior academic experiences in Gender and Women’s Studies. Students research, write, and present a senior thesis that addresses the relationship between theory and practical experience. A seminar format is used throughout the course
    • Prerequisites: GWST 2000 and completion of 60 credit hours.
    • Credits: 3-0-3

Interdisciplinary Studies (ISD)

  • ISD 2001 - Introduction to Diversity and Social Justice

    • This course is required for students pursuing an ISD Certificate. The course introduces students to global theories and practices of diversity and social justice with a focus on 20th century social movements in the US. It addresses the roots of interdisciplinarity through prominent scholars concerned with diversity and social justice. Students learn about social movements that have had a significant impact on our own time, including women’s liberation and anti-globalization.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ISD 3333 - Year of "_________" in Interdisciplinary Context I

    • This course helps students develop a holistic understanding of a particular country/region. Offered in conjunction with KSU’s “Year of” series, students gain an in-depth appreciation for the country by examining its geography, social structures, histories, philosophies, religions, politics, economics, literatures, films, arts, cultures, etc. It aims to break down stereotypes and promote a richer, more complex sense of place and identity. Important recurring themes in this course include identity formation, social justice and community engagement.
    • Prerequisites: None.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ISD 3334 - Year of "_________" in Interdisciplinary Context II

    • This course helps students develop a holistic understanding of a particular country/region. Offered in conjunction with KSU’s “Year of” series, it emphasizes contemporary issues as students examine the country’s geography, social structures, histories, philosophies, religions, politics, economics, literatures, films, arts, cultures, etc. It aims to break down stereotypes and promote a richer, more complex sense of place and identity. Important recurring themes in this course include identity formation, social justice and community engagement.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ISD 3398 - Cultural Studies Internship

    • This course is a structured off-campus experience in a supervised setting chosen in relation to the student’s focus and interests in one of the interdisciplinary programs in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. Students meet with the internship coordinator to develop an appropriate plan, which leads to the writing of a research-oriented paper or research project. The internship requires 150 hours per semester on site.
    • Prerequisites: Approval of the internship coordinator.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • ISD 3399 - ISD Certificate Colloquium

    • The Interdisciplinary Studies Colloquium course provides a capstone experience for students pursuing an ISD Certificate. The course provides students pursuing a certificate a community forum for discussing civic and community engagement projects developed through their service internships. Students examine interdisciplinary perspectives on knowledge and diversity, engage in activities beyond the classroom, and participate in a discussion forum. The course should be taken concurrently with the ISD Internship.
    • Prerequisites: Declaration of the Certificate and ISD 2001 Corequisite: ISD 3398: Internship
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • ISD 4490 - Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies

    • This upper-division course includes special topics of an interdisciplinary nature offered on a rotating basis.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102.
    • Credits: 3-0-3

Latin American/Latino Studies (LALS)

  • LALS 1102 - Understanding Latin America

    • In this course students critically approach Latin America/Latino-US from interdisciplinary perspectives while analyzing texts within a social, political, cultural, economic, historical, artistic, and geographical context. The concept of a global understanding of Latin America within the notion of a hemispheric America is emphasized, as well as how different nations relate to one another in terms of identity formation and statehood. Issues of representation in the context of immigration and multicultural relations are also studied.
    • Prerequisites: Successful completion of all Learning Support English and Learning Support Mathematics requirements.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • LALS 3770 - Latin American Cinema

    • This course examines the representation of social issues and identity formation in films from Latin America.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • LALS 3780 - Trends in Latin American/Latino Studies

    • This course focuses on current trends, issues, problems, and strategies in the field of Latin American and Latino Studies. Particular attention is paid to how socio-demographic variables, such as race, gender, class, religion, and/or ethnicity impact the issues facing the Latino/Hispanic populations in Latin America and the United States.
    • Prerequisites: None.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • LALS 4490 - Special Topics in Latin American/Latino Studies

    • A study of selected special topics of interest to faculty and students and relevant to the field of Latin American and/or Latino Studies. Course may be repeated with a change in content.
    • Prerequisites: None.
    • Credits: 3-0-3

Peace Studies (PAX)

  • PAX 1102 - Understanding Peace and Conflict

    • This course explores conceptions and practices of peace and justice. Examining peace and justice from western and non-western perspectives, and through a variety of disciplinary frameworks, this course focuses on the diverse forms of peace and justice, as well as the social and cultural contexts that have been shaped by these perspectives.
    • Prerequisites: Successful completion of all Learning Support English and Learning Support Mathematics requirements.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAX 3100 - Peace and Religion

    • This course examines selected world religions and peace through an interdisciplinary lens. Drawing primarily on religious and philosophical resources and other cultural texts, the course analyzes the conduct of religions in peace work and religious ideas about peace and peacebuilding.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 or PAX 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAX 3220 - Peace and Film

    • This course offers an interdisciplinary survey of international cinema’s use of film in peace work and the depiction of peace in film.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 or PAX 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAX 3600 - Theories of Non-violence

    • This course is a survey of the major figures and texts on the topic of non-violence from both Western and non-Western perspectives.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 or PAX 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAX 3780 - Trends in Peace Studies

    • This course focuses on current issues, trends, and activism in the field of Peace Studies. The course is interdisciplinary and includes international content in English. Course may be repeated with a change in content.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1101.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAX 4400 - Directed Study in Peace Studies

    • Directed Study in Peace Studies. Covers special topics and seminars of an advanced nature and external to regular course offerings.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAX 4490 - Special Topics in Peace Studies

    • A study of selected special topics of interest to faculty and students. Course may be repeated with a change in content.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1101.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAX 4499 - Seminar in Peace Studies

    • A seminar course for the Peace Studies Minor that integrates students’ prior coursework with the field of peace studies. Working in a collaborative manner, students design their own capstone learning projects in consultation with faculty.
    • Prerequisites: PHIL 3120 and completion of 60 credit hours.
    • Credits: 3-0-3

Religious Studies (RELS)

  • RELS 1102 - Understanding Religious Studies

    • Religious Studies is an interdisciplinary field that draws from many different academic and disciplinary approaches to understand, appreciate, compare, contrast and learn from the world’s religions, their practices and beliefs, their people and their power. This course surveys and explores the dichotomies and many issues surrounding and arising from religion in the world in order to enable students to engage in conversations critically, informatively, and dispassionately on the subject of world religion.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • RELS 3780 - Trends in Religious Studies

    • This courses focuses on current issues and trends in the field of Religious Studies. This course is interdisciplinary includes international content in English. Notes: Course may be repeated with a change in content.

      Notes: Course may be repeated with a change in content.

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 or RELS 1102.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • RELS 4400 - Directed Study

    • In this course the selected topic of an advanced nature not serve by the existing curriculum is investigated by a student working with a supervising faculty member.
    • Prerequisites: Approval of instructor and department chair prior to registration.
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • RELS 4490 - Special Topics in Religious Studies

    • This course is a study of selected special topics of interest to faculty and students.

      Notes: This course may be repeated with a change in content.

    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 or RELS 1102.
    • Credits: 3-0-3

Science, Technology, and Society (STS)

  • STS 2105 - Social Issues: Perspectives in Science and Technology

    • This course provides students with the knowledge and tools necessary to critically examine the development and integration of science, technology, and society. The course seeks to help students better understand the world in which they live, the broader implications of their major course of study, and the complex social, ethical, and moral choices presented by modern science and technology.
    • Prerequisites: Successful completion of all Learning Support English and Learning Support Mathematics requirements.
    • Credits: 2-0-2
  • STS 4000 - International Issues in Science and Technology

    • Examines the technical, social and moral issues raised by current international advances in science and technology. Places emphasis on comparative studies by examining a series of topics, each from the perspectives of a variety of nations.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 and STS 2105
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • STS 4400 - Topical Studies in Science and Technology

    • Examines the technical, social and moral issues raised by a particular issue of current concern in international science and technology. Students develop technical understanding, historical perspective and current events literacy relevant to the topic explored in a given term.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 and STS 2105
    • Credits: 3-0-3